The Irresponse to Hurricane Katrina: Conclusion


The solidarity among Catholics is still very much alive, but it may not be well. There was an overwhelming Catholic response to Hurricane Katrina, but it tapered off as time passed. Catholics cannot wait for disasters and news headlines before they come the rescue. They should be aware of their surroundings, as Jesus and the Catechism call them to be, and ready to offer all they have (money, talents, and other resources) to restore dignity to each and every human person. Jesus’ example shows Christians that prayer is both powerful and necessary, but it is not Jesus’ only tool. Catholics are equipped with prayer, knowledge, talents, and resources. It is a reality that there are poor people on this planet, and Jesus admits that in Matthew’s gospel. But there are also people with money, resources, and a Christian education guiding them how to use their money, talents, and resources.

What happened in New Orleans was unimaginable, but the lack of response in the Lower Ninth Ward is unacceptable. People saw news footage of low-class New Orleanians stranded on bridges crying out for help. Some people responded to the crisis by donating money or volunteering their time, but too many people felt bad for the victims, clicked off their televisions, and returned to their daily routines. Catholics cannot respond like this anymore. They are called to not only be aware of the situation, but also to respond to it. Four years after Hurricane Katrina, Lower Ninth Ward homeowners remain homeless. Catholics must peacefully correct this wrong. They must prepare the Lower Ninth Ward for the future by promoting more just social and political structures within the United States and the city of New Orleans.

DO NOT FEEL BAD FOR THESE VICTIMS, EXIT OUT OF THIS WIKI, AND RETURN TO YOUR DAILY ROUTINE!

Here is a thank you article featured in the Times-Picayune to all the 2009 spring break volunteers:

http://blog.nola.com/stephaniegrace/2009/03/3_12_years_later_help_keeps_po.html


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